写真サイトです。

<   2007年 12月 ( 22 )   > この月の画像一覧

More Dazaifu

Here are some more shots from Dazaifu and around. It is coming close to the New Year, so the town is becoming lively with New Year shopping.
c0110677_19413187.jpg


c0110677_19415419.jpg


This is my favourite restaurant. This is a chain restaurant, actually. They serve traditional, formal Japanese course meal. The food is tofu based, and many dishes are vegetarian. Quite casual place for this type of cuisine. The place used to be the mansion of the local lord, and is now turned into a restaurant. With reservation, you can request a private room facing the beautiful Japanese garden, and also the type of china to be used in your meal. Some people say that the food is not the very best, but it's quite fine enough for me.
c0110677_1947625.jpg


The garden. It is pretty big, and there is a tea house (or tea hut), too.
c0110677_19474869.jpg


Path to the restaurant after the gate.
c0110677_19491868.jpg


And this is a Bhuddist temple near the shrine. It is a zen temple. There are all sorts of different Bhuddist temples.
c0110677_19513918.jpg


c0110677_1952281.jpg


I really like this temple. It is nice at any time of the year. It is quiet here even if it is noisy just outside. Every time I come back to Japan I visit this town of Dazaifu. This town has both lively, down-to -earth daily life and the sacred, peaceful silence.
c0110677_19522630.jpg
[PR]
by ammolitering3 | 2007-12-29 20:01

Dazaifu

Dazaifu is a very old town in Northern Kyushu. I like it here a lot. The huge shrine here, Tenmangu Shrine, is very famous, and it is surely grand. The place is full of tourists at any time of the year, and it is completely jammed in the New Year and also in March. March is the season for the entry exams for schools, and this shrine is well known for being beneficial for academic achievements. This is because the presiding deity here, Lord Sugawara Michizane, was a famous scholor in the old capital.

The shrine is also notorious for separating the couple. This is because Lord Sugawara was accused for something I don't know and sent to this isolated land of Kyushu. Only barbarians live here, and the lord became very sad. His beloved prum tree missed him so much that it flew all the way from Kyoto. If any of you visited this shrine with your darling, please visit the shirne called Kamado Shrine behind the Tenmangu Shrine next time. It is known for giving you a nice wife or husband. The 30 minutes hike to the shrine is worth it to ammend your now cursed relationship...
c0110677_17415055.jpg


People are gathered around...
c0110677_17421679.jpg


...the monkey who does tricks. This is one of the old arts which were performed as sacrifice to the shrines.
c0110677_17442221.jpg


Lucky charms for sale.
c0110677_1744575.jpg


Crisp, warm and mildly sweet dumplings. One MUST eat one of these when visiting this shrine. There are just about 100 stores selling them, maybe more, and it is impossible to keep walking straight ignoring all the sales clerks standing in front of their respective stores and calling you in. These dumplings are actually pretty good.
c0110677_174550100.jpg


Wishing boards. People buy one of these wooden pieces, and write thier wish on it.
c0110677_17503334.jpg


Like this. 'Please make my students pass the exams. Please give them better academic scores.'
c0110677_17515173.jpg


These yellow things are the paper with your fortune written on them. If they are not very good, you tie them onto these wooden structures. People tie them to anything on the shrine property, actually. Tree branches especially. But it is not appreciated at a big shrine like this. So they provide you with special place to tie them.
c0110677_19312854.jpg


This is a street that leads to the shrine. Most shrines have a special street like this called 'sando' or road of pilgrimage, so to speak. Shrines also have their own forest on the back. A huge shrine like this has a mountain behind and a busy shopping street in the front. Tiny ones have a few trees on the back and just a short, narrow path with 2 stone poles on both sides indicating that the path is the sacred one.
c0110677_1935558.jpg
[PR]
by ammolitering3 | 2007-12-29 17:52

A Mountain Shrine

A frind of mine took me to a small shrine in the mountainous area of the city. Somebody thought it was a good idea to light up this shrine at night. How silly.
c0110677_16575656.jpg


c0110677_16585088.jpg


c0110677_16591011.jpg


c0110677_170884.jpg
[PR]
by ammolitering3 | 2007-12-29 17:26

Japan

Persimmon tree. It is an old custom to leave some fruits for the crows. This particular tree bears the tanic persimmon. In fact, all the persimmon trees in the wild bear the tanic fruits. The fruits are not edible as they are, so they have to be treated in various ways. The most common method is drying. Fruits are peeled and hung outside in the crisp late autumn air.
c0110677_16344628.jpg


This tree is bearing laundry.
c0110677_16381448.jpg


Deity of some kind, but it looks like a rock on concrete to me.
c0110677_16385240.jpg


Vegetable market in front of a supermarket.
c0110677_16394229.jpg


I asked my my neice what Christmas is. The 7 years old told me with confidence that it is the day that Santa brings present and she eats a piece of cake.
c0110677_16454431.jpg


Daikon, the big white radish, is being dry on the bamboo basket. Cold, sunny winter days are perfect for it. Cut the daikon into thin pieces and dry for a few days. Then steam them and dry them again. They become very sweet naturally. Daikon dried in this way can be soaked and cook to make a delicious dish. But I like to chew on them myself.
c0110677_1648731.jpg


[PR]
by ammolitering3 | 2007-12-29 16:40

Japan

Huge shopping mall. Where am I?
c0110677_1619169.jpg


And a coupel of huge pears.
c0110677_16201926.jpg


c0110677_16204752.jpg


c0110677_16211523.jpg


Waiting room at a small train station. Merry Christmas to all, whatever Christmas is anyway.
c0110677_16225517.jpg


I went to have a flu shot. There at the clinic I found this display of recommended daily diet for people with diabetic.
c0110677_16241129.jpg


Melon is expensive in Japan. Fruits in general are expensive, but melons are particularly so. This is because fruits are treated as sweets traditionaly. The growers have been creating hybrids for decades, and grow their crop with such care to make them perfect.
c0110677_1625285.jpg


And yes, it's really really tasty. I once had a taste of the pear that was grown for the emperor. No, I didn't eat at the same table with him. The farmer in our town was appointed to grow for the emperor, and I was lucky enough to have a few from his garden. I do admit... it was the very best pear I have ever had, naturally.
c0110677_16294760.jpg
[PR]
by ammolitering3 | 2007-12-29 16:21

Japan

`Let`s talk about tomorrow`s dream`, it says. Japan is full of these messages. I don`t know how effective they are, but at least it feels better to see them than grafitti swear words.
c0110677_16535225.jpg


c0110677_16542367.jpg


c0110677_16545833.jpg


c0110677_16552413.jpg


I visited the workshop and the store of a local wood worker. Mr. Hatanaka is the city treasure of Owase. He is recognized for making beautiful high quality furniture with local materials, using the natural odd shapes of the materials as advantage, not as disadvantage. 30 years ago, when Japan was wholeheartedly chasing after efficiency and economical growth, his practice was given very little value. However, his furniture making was recognized by a professor from Kyoto University who was studying the works of George Nakashima, a Japanese American furniture maker. He was a Bhuddist, and his religeous belief influenced his works.

Mr. Hatanaka then took interest in George Nakashima, and to this day he has been deepening his respect for nature through his art. Mr. Hatanaka said `If we cut a tree 300 hundred years old, we must make it into something that we can use for 300 hundred years.`
c0110677_1656010.jpg


He usually makes big, expensive custom made furnitures. I thought about buying a few of them for several thousand dollars each, but I somehow changed my mind.
c0110677_16562893.jpg


His wife helps the store. She also does some wood working. She mostly makes small things, using the scrap materials from her husband`s works. She said that she wants to use every part of the tree without wasting, because it used to be alive, and in this way she hopes that the tree would be happy. Their daughter helps the store as a sales clerk, too.
c0110677_16564950.jpg


Mr. and Mrs. Hatanaka opened the workshop and the store just for me, on their day off. Thank you very much.
c0110677_165711100.jpg


Mr. Hatanaka talks about his trees.
c0110677_17235346.jpg


A present for me! ( Flowers are not included)
c0110677_17244088.jpg


c0110677_1725351.jpg


c0110677_17261118.jpg


I liked this little lamp.
c0110677_17263225.jpg
[PR]
by ammolitering3 | 2007-12-15 16:58

Japan

c0110677_10535786.jpg


c0110677_1054251.jpg


c0110677_10544846.jpg


c0110677_1055153.jpg


c0110677_10553595.jpg


c0110677_10555835.jpg
[PR]
by ammolitering3 | 2007-12-15 10:56

Japan

There is a big new museum just outside the town which is made with its prised local wood. The path leading up the museum is paved with stones, echoing the image of the World Heritage paths in the mountains.
c0110677_10432962.jpg


Inside the museum. It smells great.
c0110677_10455410.jpg


c0110677_10462844.jpg


For each log used for the building, the name plate is attached to show the name of the forester.
c0110677_1049124.jpg


A museum shop is built separately. The buiding is an old house, relocated to this place and renovated as a store and a cafe.
c0110677_1048124.jpg


c0110677_10493556.jpg




c0110677_1051442.jpg


c0110677_10512459.jpg
[PR]
by ammolitering3 | 2007-12-15 10:51

Japan

Garbage day.
c0110677_1037404.jpg


c0110677_1038495.jpg


Police station in powder green.
c0110677_10383057.jpg


c0110677_10385656.jpg


c0110677_10391528.jpg


c0110677_10395936.jpg


Taxi drivers.
c0110677_10402084.jpg
[PR]
by ammolitering3 | 2007-12-15 10:40

Japan

Some more Owase pictures for you... I `m not showing many pictures which show people very clearly, because of privacy and all that stuff. But I did meet many very interesting, energetic peole on my trip. According to Mr. Yuasa, this town had a very nice ruling family. People lived happily in this closed but orderly town with peace of mind, and I think that it helped to give the citizens the sense of confidence that they are heard as long as they are reasonable.
c0110677_10313394.jpg


c0110677_10315583.jpg


c0110677_10321512.jpg


c0110677_10324559.jpg


c0110677_1033284.jpg


c0110677_10335510.jpg


c0110677_1035143.jpg
[PR]
by ammolitering3 | 2007-12-15 10:35



ときどき更新します。ときどきご覧ください。
カテゴリ
全体
未分類
以前の記事
お気に入りブログ
検索
その他のジャンル
記事ランキング
ブログジャンル
画像一覧